Passionate People: Dan and Joanne Miller

Do you dread Mondays? Are you dragging yourself out of bed to go to work?


You’re not alone. Dan Miller from 48days.com shared a startling statistic: 84% of American Workers say they would like to change jobs in the coming year.

Either we have a lot of upwardly mobile people or there’s just a lot of people unhappy or dissatisfied with their jobs.

That was me a couple of years ago.

I was fortunate. I met Dan Miller and his wife, Joanne in 2011. At the time, I was deep into reading two of Dan’s books, No More Dreaded Mondays and 48 Days to the Work You Love.  I had a job I loved, but I was losing my passion for it day by day.  I was deep into Dan’s books while on a train heading to a speaking gig. I came across this paragraph:

As Frederick Buechner said, “The place God calls you to is the place where your deep gladness and the world’s deep hunger meet.” Ask yourself: What is the world hungering for right now? How can I use my unique skills and talents to satisfy that hunger? Don’t rest until you find that answer.

I started filling up spiral bound notebooks with ideas, thoughts, desires, and more. By the end of the train ride back home, I wrote my first book, and have continued to use that paragraph above to bring clarity to my daily life.

dan miller quote

I took Dan’s Coaching with Excellence Workshop (highly recommended if you want to add coaching to your services or become a coach or his Innovate workshop if you are a creative) and it was there that I met Dan and Joanne for the first time.

the millers with karen putz

Dan is known for his 48 Days podcast, community, and coaching services. He specializes in helping people discover and understand their natural skills and abilities and turn those into profit. His newsletter goes out to over 130,000 people and his podcast is among the top five for careers.

When it comes to living with passion, Dan and Joanne are a beautiful example of what it means to enjoy life and live it fully. They have instilled those lessons in their children and grandchildren.

Joanne’s passion is art, and she did not unwrap that passion until long after she was done raising her children. Today, she hosts a weekly art class at The Sanctuary near Nashville and she’s the author of several books, including Creating a Haven of Peace When You’re Feeling Down, Finances are Flat, and Tempers are Rising. She inspires other women in midlife to learn new things and dig in deep to discover their own gifts.

karen and dan miller

I always recommend Dan’s events–I am still connected with people that I met at my first event there. Each event is limited to no more than 50 people, so it’s a wonderful chance to get to know others and build relationships. Plus, you get to learn from just about the whole Miller family as well! Check out Dan’s resources and events here:

48 Days

Find out what Dan Miller has to say about passion in my upcoming book, Unwrapping Your Passion.

 

The Ghost at the Lake House

IMG_3371

“So, what do you do for fun?” I asked Brenda Schmidt between bites of dinner. We were on our way to see Jeff Foxworthy and Larry the Cable Guy at the Rialto Theater in Joliet.

“My husband and I hunt ghosts for fun.”

I nearly dropped my fork. Not because I had the reaction that most people do about ghosts–the “let’s not talk about uncomfortable topics” squirm, but because it was a subject I had lived with for many years.

Back in 1977, my parents bought two cottages on Christie Lake in Michigan. Mike, the next door neighbor, told us some stories about the previous occupants, including the original owner, Mr. Eberhart, who died at the end of the pier during a storm.

For many years, I felt Mr. Eberhart’s spirit in the tiny bedroom that I shared with my sister.

When my parents moved the house (literally) across town and built their retirement home on the same spot, Mr. Eberhart settled in. For many years, we were busy with the kids. However, whenever I slept in the “Blue Room,” I felt like he was there.

One day, my father asked me if I believed in ghosts.

I told him yes. I told him I felt Mr. Eberhart’s spirit and that he never left. We compared our stories–the footsteps at night (Dad heard this) and the impossible-to-open closet doors that were left open in the middle of the night. My sister also experienced the open closet doors, so I knew I wasn’t imagining things.

We started sharing the stories with visitors and it made for lively conversations around the fire at night. Then our visitors began experiencing Mr. Eberhart’s antics. Whispers in the ear, “I’m still here,” flashing lights, disappearing items.

My mother never believed any of it. The ghost had a habit of turning on the radio in my boat and draining the battery. I replaced the battery, rewired the boat, and figured the problem was solved.

One evening, I took my mom out for a sunset ride in the boat. When we docked, I made sure she watched me turn off the radio, because my father accused the kids of leaving it on.

We were on the dock when out of the corner of my eye, I saw the radio light turn on.

“Mom, you saw me turn off the radio, right?”

She nodded.

“Well, take a look at the radio now.”

Her mouth dropped open.

Yet, she still didn’t believe in ghosts.

So when Brenda told me that her husband Paul was the president of The Illinois Paranomalists , I had to share the story. I gave them a copy of Totally Scared, which featured the story of the ghost at the lake house.

Could we prove the ghost theory?

Paul was intrigued. He stopped by my house to get a key and headed up to the lake house. He spent several hours there, setting up equipment and recording both audio and visual modes.

The results were pretty clear: the house was haunted. I was finally validated after all the years of sharing “ghost stories.”

I invited Paul to share his experiences: 

I am extremely honored that Karen invited me to be a guest on her blog.  The hardest thing has been deciding what to write.  

Karen writes about finding and following your passion.  I have a lifelong passion for the paranormal—resulting in my becoming a ghost hunter.  

Paul Goldenrod

I grew up reading everything I could on ghosts: Bigfoot, the Bermuda triangle, Loch Ness monster, etc.  I enjoyed the fact that there are still mysteries in the world.  I dreamed of one day actually seeing one of these mysterious phenomena.  Unfortunately, advances in technology have proven many of these supposed mysteries to be nonexistent or in some cases fabricated.  

About 11 years ago I realized it was possible to pursue my interests in ghosts when the show “Ghosthunters” first appeared on the SyFy channel.  Like many of my ghost hunting friends a light bulb went off and I realized people actually do this stuff.  

I began researching and going on “pay to hunt” public hunts.  I then joined a club and learned all I could.  At the urging of my family I finally formed my own club with a group of friends—The Illinois Paranormalists (TIP).  We all love to ghost hunt and have fun together.  We’ve explored places like the Rialto Theatre in Joliet, The Eldred house, and the Goldenrod Showboat.

Rialto monitors Eldred House

Karen and my wife Brenda are friends and during a dinner conversation my hobby came up.  Karen’s family owned a home for many years that they thought was haunted but did not have proof.  She invited me to investigate and I jumped at the chance to visit somewhere no one else had ever investigated.  (BTW:  you’d be surprised how many people tell me they live, work, or know of a haunted location.)

I brought my cameras and recorders and investigated into the night.  While I was there, I had some very interesting personal experiences. To me the most interesting thing was actually how my body tingled for at least an hour when I was up in the bedroom that Karen identified as haunted.  Karen says the spirit  would say “I’m still here” to occasional visitors. I  could not believe the reaction of my KII meter when I asked the question “are you still here”.  Usually a few additional lights light up, but my meter went crazy with the lights going up and down in a blur.  In 20/20 hindsight, I wish I had filmed it with my iPhone.  The camera I had in the room was pointed too high to catch it.    My recorders however captured a number of unexplained loud noises in the bedroom where the haunting appears to be centered. 

Karen was happy to finally have some validation to the experiences she had while in the house over the years.

If you are interested or have more questions, my club has a webpage at www.ghosttip.com and a Facebook page.  I want to thank Karen again for giving me this opportunity.

 

What an ‘Old Lady’ Taught Me About Life

At the age of 44, I thought I was old.

I felt old.

I wasn’t looking forward to the years ahead. Aches. Pains. Wrinkles. Medicines. It seemed like everyone around me was slowing down and just going through the motions of each day, coasting until they could reach retirement. And for some, retirement simply meant they could watch their television programs anytime they wanted to.

So there I sat on my 44th birthday with tears running down my face, thinking that the best years of life had passed me by. I missed the carefree days of my youth spent gliding across the water on the soles of my feet. I had tried barefoot water skiing the day before my birthday, with dismal results. My feet, I reasoned, were truly hung up to dry.

Until an “Old Lady” changed my life.

My husband sent me a link to a TODAY Show segment featuring Judy Myers, a 66-year-old competitive barefoot water skier. I sat there and watched the TODAY Show over and over. The passion that I saw on Judy’s face reminded me of the feelings I had when I was a teen. I loved barefoot water skiing.

judy and karen

I got in touch with Judy and she invited me to Florida to learn how to barefoot water ski again. In the process, I gained a mentor and a friend. Judy taught me some great lessons that apply to life; lessons that I put together in a new book, Outside the Wake, How an “Old Lady” Taught Me to Live.

Outside_the_Wake

At the age of 44, I thought life was a downward slide of life becoming less and less, and I was afraid that the best years of life were behind me.

Judy taught me the opposite: the best years of life can be whatever you want them to be. You don’t have to accept growing older–you can choose to grow BOLDER instead.

Grab a copy and find out for yourself: Outside the Wake

10570522_10152492225256652_1154840280118755826_n

What My Daughter Taught Me About Passion

passion in NY

“Mom, I’m quitting college.”

Not the words I wanted to hear, but I shouldn’t have been too surprised. My daughter, Ren, had a love/hate relationship with formalized education since she was in elementary school. I can remember some days having to shove her out the car door to make her go to school.

(Yes, I was that kind of parent.)

“Okay, so what’s your plan?” I asked her.

She had her heart set on acting. She was going to come home after the semester ended and figure out a plan. She might move to New York City and live with her cousin. She might try and get a job in Los Angeles and live with a friend. She just knew she wasn’t going to go back to college. Acting school, maybe.

As a parent, I wrestled with a whole range of emotions.

The parent side of me screamed, “oh-my-gosh-she’s-gonna-have-a-tough-life-without-a-degree!”

The Passion Coach side of me calmly whispered, “let her have her journey, she’ll figure it out.”

My conversations with Ren showcased the whole range of those emotions and thoughts. During one conversation, I was calm and rational, even positive. During other conversations, I brought out the “play it safe” cards and the “get your degree first–after that you can do whatever you want” rationality. I think I said some not-so-nice things.

“How can you tell others to follow their passions if you won’t let your own daughter follow her heart?” she asked me.

Yes, she called me on it.

And she was right. I had to let go. This was her journey. Even if I pulled the parenting card and insisted she stay in college, I knew it would create the biggest thorn between us. She had been miserable with school since fourth grade and we had plenty of battles over it.

As the end of summer rolled around, the plan was still unclear. My daughter even had moments of self-doubt, of wondering what direction to go in next.

Then out of the blue, she found an audition for Spring Awakening on Broadway. Without a single bit of hesitation, she booked a flight.

spring awakening with ren

When she called me on FaceTime to tell me that she acquired a swing role in the play, the joy on her face was crazy radiant. Within a month, she moved to New York City and began studying the lines for four different roles. It wasn’t an easy journey. She slept on a couch until she could find a place of her own. She had to learn the roles without much practice time on the stage.

spring awakening lauren

After many, many weeks of sitting in the audience, the swing room, and backstage, Ren made her debut on stage in the role of Thea. I flew to New York and her older brother joined me. As we sat in the audience waiting for the play to begin, my heart was pounding for her. She was going to step on a Broadway stage for the first time.

spring awakening debut

I thought back to a lesson that Janet Attwood, author of The Passion Test, taught me. “Whenever you are faced with a decision, a choice, or an opportunity, always choose in favor of your passions.” And Ren had done just that. She chose passion.

I can’t even begin to describe the incredible feeling that bubbled inside of me as I watched Ren perform with Marlee Matlin, Camryn Manheim, Andy Mientus and the Spring Awakening cast. Perform doesn’t even seem to be the right word. She became Thea.

As the cast took their final bow, I thought back to the uncertainty Ren faced when she made the decision to walk away from the “safe” route to pursue something she was immensely passionate about. She didn’t have a plan. She didn’t know the “how.” But she was very, very clear on the what.

And the passion? Well, see for yourself:

Spring Awakening Cast Congratulates Ren After Debut

Are you new here? Subscribe to receive the next post and other goodies! Yes, I want more PASSION in my life!

My Mom’s New Life, How You Can Choose to Live Passionately At Any Age

photo (6)

“I really like this house. I can see myself living here,” my mom said.

 My mom, my sister, my daughter, and my niece were all crammed into a car for a winter-getaway trip to Florida. On the way down, we stopped to tour the model homes for sale at an adult-living community in Nashville. My mom and sister were tired of the long winters in Michigan and looking for a new place to live. The target was Florida and they were planning to rent a house there for three months.

Everything changed the minute we all walked into the house in Nashville. A few hours later, my mom and my sister made the decision to sell the lake house we’ve had since 1977 and move to a place where they knew no one.

Just like that.

The move turned out to be a rough one, with one challenge after another presenting itself. But at 87 years of age, after dealing with a lifetime of challenges, my mom simply buckled down and tackled them as they happened.

There were times my mom and sister questioned their decision, but overall, the move was the best thing for them both. Despite health challenges, my mom has been trying new things–such as learning yoga and zipping around the track with her walker.

When it comes to creating a passionate life, one of the most common complaints I come across is: “I’m too old.”

Are you really?

Check your pulse. If you still have a pulse, you still have a life. At any given time, you can change your thoughts, your attitude, your outlook, and your actions.

 

 

 

 

Old Age–It’s a State of Mind

 

Every muscle ached when I sat down in the plane for the flight home. I had just left the World Barefoot Center in Winter Haven, Florida, where I spent a few days barefoot water skiing.

“What happened to your eye?” my son asked when he picked me up at Midway airport.

 “Ah, I fell backwards and popped a blood vessel,” I explained.

I was also sporting a colorful collection of bruises dotting my body and a swollen tongue.

At the age of 44, I took up the extreme sport of barefooting again–more than 25 years after becoming deaf from a fall.  I spent three days in a boat with three other gals, but at age 45, I was the youngest one there. Kim Taylor is 48, Claudia Landon is 58– and at 68 years of age, Judy Myers is the world’s oldest female competitive barefoot water skier.

“Suck it up,” Judy told me when I dared to complain about my aching body on the second day. When I watch her on the water–I find it hard to believe that this woman is almost seventy years old. Her nickname is the “Old Lady,” but she skims on the water– backwards, forwards and on one foot. Even when she falls at 36 mph, there’s a smile on her face when she surfaces.

  I’m thankful I met Judy– because she changed my life and gave me a whole new way to look forward to the years ahead. She smashes the stereotypes of what it means to grow older– reminding me that “old age” is nothing but a state of mind. As we add more candles to the birthday cake each year, it seems like it’s all too easy to buy into the notion that we are supposed to slow down and become more careful as we age. We are often bombarded with messages that perpetuate the stereotypes of aging, or what I call the “I’m-too-old-to-do-that” syndrome. Instead of accepting the status quo, why not go out and be the first person to shatter the age myth?

Take Jim Boyette, for example. He took up barefoot water skiing at the age of 45 and began to compete in barefoot tournaments. Every single year, he shows up at the Barefoot Nationals and has not missed a tournament since he started in 1978. That’s right– do the math– Jim is 83 years old and still competes in an extreme sport. And to top it off, Jim has Charcot Marie Tooth disease– which atrophies his feet and arms, but he doesn’t let that stop him on the water. As Samuel Ullman once said, “Nobody grows old merely by living a number of years. We grow old by deserting our ideals.Years may wrinkle the skin, but to give up enthusiasm wrinkles the soul.”

Published in the Chicago Tribune, May 2011

Why Everyone Should Write Their Own Obituary

Emily Phillips photo by Bonnie Upright

Emily Phillips photo by Bonnie Upright

 

Twenty nine days.

That’s all the time Emily Phillips had left after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Twenty nine days to hug her family and friends. To forgive. To reflect back on life and all the lessons and memorable moments.

Emily went to work and penned her own obituary. She must have been quite the sassy, funny lady, because after reading every word, I wished I could have met her. No doubt she left a big hole in the hearts of people who knew her, but her obituary went viral and touch millions (yes, millions!)

Toward the end of her obituary, Emily summed up her life:

So…I was born; I blinked; and it was over.

 

 

So this had me thinking this morning–every one of us should write our own obituaries. Perhaps if we faced the final days of our lives in the middle of NOW, we would cherish every moment instead of throwing it away. Perhaps we would reach out and say the loving words that others need to hear. Perhaps we would design the next days and hopefully years of our lives in a much different way than we are slodging through today.

No buildings named after me; no monuments erected in my honor.
But I DID have the chance to know and love each and every friend as well as all my family members. How much more blessed can a person be? 

We are indeed blessed, but sometimes we forget. Sometimes we get wrapped up in issues that won’t have an impact ten minutes, much less ten months, later.

So for a few minutes today, write out your obituary. How do you want to be remembered? What impact do you want to leave behind with your loved ones? What is your purpose, your gifts, your skills…and how did you share them with the world?

If an obituary is just too much, you can do your 100th birthday party speech in the same way.

At any point, you can change your path, change your thoughts, and change your words so that your obituary or 100th birthday reflects the life you truly want to live. Then go out and live it.

So in the end, remember…do your best, follow your arrow, and make something amazing out of your life. Oh, and never stop smiling.
If you want to, you can look for me in the evening sunset or with the earliest spring daffodils or amongst the flitting and fluttering butterflies. You know I’ll be there in one form or another. Of course that will probably comfort some while antagonizing others, but you know me…it’s what I do.
I’ll leave you with this…please don’t cry because I’m gone; instead be happy that I was here. (Or maybe you can cry a little bit. After all, I have passed away).
Today I am happy and I am dancing. Probably naked.
Love you forever.
Emily

Emily Phillips Obituary

Inspiring Mom Bloggers Summit!

I am honored to have been chosen by the summit host, Elayna Fernandez ~ The Positive MOM, to be able to share my journey from pain to passion, give some insider tips on unwrapping your own passion, and inspire you to live a life of fun and joy! I met Elayna at a Passion Test training and I've been completely inspired by her journey--Elayna built her business as a single mom and rose to incredible success. She is now married to an amazing fellow and she helps others with their entrepreneurial dreams.

On this summit, you will also hear 20 of the most inspiring moms in the blogosphere share their stories and how they overcame obstacles in their way and turned their pain into their purpose.

I know that when you sign up for the Inspiring Mom Bloggers summit you will laugh, cry, and learn from all the inspiring, motivating, and uplifting messages that will be shared and that many lives will be touched.

This summit starts January 5th and there will be a new speaker each day sharing their trials and triumphs with balancing mompreneurship, motherhood and everything in between! Topics include Balance, Finances, Conquering Fears, Health, Fitness, and Weight, Empowering Thoughts and Words, Marriage and Relationships, Grief,  Single Motherhood, Postpartum Depression, Unexpected Life Changes, Handling a Miscarriage, Healing Autism, Finding Joy in Physical Pain, Overcoming Obstacles, No Regrets SAHM, Overcoming Abuse, Homeschooling Expectations, and much more!

There is NO COST for this online summit. Transcripts will be available. You can join the summit here: Yes, count me in! 

InspiringMomBloggers.com_

 

'>

Inspiring Mom Bloggers Virtual Summit: 21 Inspiring Interviews

Im-Speaking-At-The-Inspiring-Mom-Bloggers-Virtual-Summit-Facebook-Timeline

As a mom of three kids, I often find myself trying to juggle 20 things while typing a text and cooking dinner–all at once! And oh hey–look, a kite! No, wait, make that a squirrel flying a kite!

If you find yourself juggling parenthood and you’ve lost yourself in the process, then you need to sign up for the Inspiring Mom Bloggers Summit!

I am honored to have been chosen by the summit host, Elayna Fernandez ~ The Positive MOM, to be able to share my journey from pain to passion, give some insider tips on unwrapping your own passion, and inspire you to live a life of fun and joy! I met Elayna at a Passion Test training and I’ve been completely inspired by her journey–Elayna built her business as a single mom and rose to incredible success. She is now married to an amazing fellow and she helps others with their entrepreneurial dreams.

On this summit, you will also hear 20 of the most inspiring moms in the blogosphere share their stories and how they overcame obstacles in their way and turned their pain into their purpose.

I know that when you sign up for the Inspiring Mom Bloggers summit you will laugh, cry, and learn from all the inspiring, motivating, and uplifting messages that will be shared and that many lives will be touched.

This summit starts January 5th and there will be a new speaker each day sharing their trials and triumphs with balancing mompreneurship, motherhood and everything in between! Topics include Balance, Finances, Conquering Fears, Health, Fitness, and Weight, Empowering Thoughts and Words, Marriage and Relationships, Grief,  Single Motherhood, Postpartum Depression, Unexpected Life Changes, Handling a Miscarriage, Healing Autism, Finding Joy in Physical Pain, Overcoming Obstacles, No Regrets SAHM, Overcoming Abuse, Homeschooling Expectations, and much more!

There is NO COST for this online summit. Transcripts will be available. You can join the summit here: Yes, count me in! 

InspiringMomBloggers.com_

 

Money: Master the Game, 7 Simple Steps to Financial Freedom.  (I'm halfway through the book and have learned more about money than anything I've ever read before.)

After going over the questionnaire I had filled out earlier and talking about my goals, the coach asked me a question. "Do you have a fear of being vulnerable?"

At first, I didn't want to answer that question with the truth. The strong, confident part of me wanted to say, "Oh no, I'm open and vulnerable all the time. For crying out loud, I teach other people to open up and reveal the beautiful, imperfect parts of themselves!"

But the raw, dig-down, lets-get-real part of me knew the answer. I was afraid to be vulnerable. To open up. To allow hurt, disappointment, and anger to creep in, and heck, bust out. To acknowledge the areas where I've failed, said the wrong thing, made the wrong decisions, fell apart, or generally screwed up. Vulnerability is a scary thing.

Yet, vulnerability is what connects us on another level. The more vulnerable we are, the more human we are. The more we show the inner depths of our being, the more we connect with others. In less than 30 minutes, this coach dug deep inside and came up with the reason I was dragging my feet on several things. The good news: fear of being vulnerable is simply a mindset. And a mindset, as we all know, is something we can change in an instant. A slight shift in perspective can change an outcome.

I came across this quote from Brene' Brown that really resonated with me:

The truth is: Belonging starts with self-acceptance. Your level of belonging, in fact, can never be greater than your level of self-acceptance, because believing that you're enough is what gives you the courage to be authentic, vulnerable and imperfect.

Brene goes into depth about the power of vulnerability in her TED talk. . And in the quote above, Brene expands on it as she wraps up her talk:

This is what I have found: to let ourselves be seen,deeply seen, vulnerably seen; to love with our whole hearts, even though there's no guarantee -- and that's really hard, and I can tell you as a parent, that's excruciatingly difficult -- to practice gratitude and joy in those moments of terror, when we're wondering, "Can I love you this much? Can I believe in this this passionately? Can I be this fierce about this?" just to be able to stop and, instead of catastrophizing what might happen, to say, "I'm just so grateful, because to feel this vulnerable means I'm alive." And the last, which I think is probably the most important, is to believe that we're enough. Because when we work from a place, I believe, that says, "I'm enough," then we stop screaming and start listening, we're kinder and gentler to the people around us, and we're kinder and gentler to ourselves.

It's well worth the watch!

'>

In Praise of Vulnerability

I was on the phone with a Tony Robbin’s coach, a 30-minute session that I received as gift during the launch of Tony’s new book, Money: Master the Game, 7 Simple Steps to Financial Freedom.  (I’m halfway through the book and have learned more about money than anything I’ve ever read before.)

After going over the questionnaire I had filled out earlier and talking about my goals, the coach asked me a question. “Do you have a fear of being vulnerable?”

At first, I didn’t want to answer that question with the truth. The strong, confident part of me wanted to say, “Oh no, I’m open and vulnerable all the time. For crying out loud, I teach other people to open up and reveal the beautiful, imperfect parts of themselves!”

But the raw, dig-down, lets-get-real part of me knew the answer. I was afraid to be vulnerable. To open up. To allow hurt, disappointment, and anger to creep in, and heck, bust out. To acknowledge the areas where I’ve failed, said the wrong thing, made the wrong decisions, fell apart, or generally screwed up. Vulnerability is a scary thing.

Yet, vulnerability is what connects us on another level. The more vulnerable we are, the more human we are. The more we show the inner depths of our being, the more we connect with others. In less than 30 minutes, this coach dug deep inside and came up with the reason I was dragging my feet on several things. The good news: fear of being vulnerable is simply a mindset. And a mindset, as we all know, is something we can change in an instant. A slight shift in perspective can change an outcome.

I came across this quote from Brene’ Brown that really resonated with me:

The truth is: Belonging starts with self-acceptance. Your level of belonging, in fact, can never be greater than your level of self-acceptance, because believing that you’re enough is what gives you the courage to be authentic, vulnerable and imperfect.

Brene goes into depth about the power of vulnerability in her TED talk. . And in the quote above, Brene expands on it as she wraps up her talk:

This is what I have found: to let ourselves be seen,deeply seen, vulnerably seen; to love with our whole hearts, even though there’s no guarantee — and that’s really hard, and I can tell you as a parent, that’s excruciatingly difficult — to practice gratitude and joy in those moments of terror, when we’re wondering, “Can I love you this much? Can I believe in this this passionately? Can I be this fierce about this?” just to be able to stop and, instead of catastrophizing what might happen, to say, “I’m just so grateful, because to feel this vulnerable means I’m alive.” And the last, which I think is probably the most important, is to believe that we’re enough. Because when we work from a place, I believe, that says, “I’m enough,” then we stop screaming and start listening, we’re kinder and gentler to the people around us, and we’re kinder and gentler to ourselves.

It’s well worth the watch!

The Power of She: Don’t Put A Limit on What You Can Do

 

karen-and-judy-2015

Five years ago, my husband Joe sent me a link that forever changed my life. It was a TODAY Show segment featuring Judy Myers, a 66-year-old barefoot water skier from California.

Barefoot Water Skier is Landing on her Feet at 66

Judy inspired me to get back on the water and dive back into my passion for barefoot water skiing. The “Old Lady” taught me many lessons on and off the water, including the biggest one of all: don’t put a limit on what you can do. Age really truly is a number–and you can choose to grow bolder instead of older.

Catch Judy’s story (and mine) on “The Power of She” on Headline News:

Making a Splash: Senior Barefooter, 71, Inspires

Transcript included.